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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:甘琼芳 大小:21clB2Q926120KB 下载:G0GtMKOX96055次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:Kr5029q744150条
日期:2020-08-05 07:38:43
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Amphinomus drew his sword and made straight at Ulysses to tryand get him away from the door; but Telemachus was too quick forhim, and struck him from behind; the spear caught him between theshoulders and went right through his chest, so that he fell heavily tothe ground and struck the earth with his forehead. Then Telemachussprang away from him, leaving his spear still in the body, for hefeared that if he stayed to draw it out, some one of the Achaeansmight come up and hack at him with his sword, or knock him down, so heset off at a run, and immediately was at his father's side. Then hesaid:
2.  With these words he made a drink-offering, and when he had drunkhe put the gold cup again into the hands of Amphinomus, who walkedaway serious and bowing his head, for he foreboded evil. But even sohe did not escape destruction, for Minerva had doomed him fall bythe hand of Telemachus. So he took his seat again at the place fromwhich he had come.
3.  "We soon reached his cave, but he was out shepherding, so we wentinside and took stock of all that we could see. His cheese-rackswere loaded with cheeses, and he had more lambs and kids than his penscould hold. They were kept in separate flocks; first there were thehoggets, then the oldest of the younger lambs and lastly the veryyoung ones all kept apart from one another; as for his dairy, allthe vessels, bowls, and milk pails into which he milked, were swimmingwith whey. When they saw all this, my men begged me to let themfirst steal some cheeses, and make off with them to the ship; theywould then return, drive down the lambs and kids, put them on boardand sail away with them. It would have been indeed better if we haddone so but I would not listen to them, for I wanted to see theowner himself, in the hope that he might give me a present. When,however, we saw him my poor men found him ill to deal with.
4.  AND ULYSSES answered, "King Alcinous, it is a good thing to hear abard with such a divine voice as this man has. There is nothing betteror more delightful than when a whole people make merry together,with the guests sitting orderly to listen, while the table is loadedwith bread and meats, and the cup-bearer draws wine and fills hiscup for every man. This is indeed as fair a sight as a man can see.Now, however, since you are inclined to ask the story of my sorrows,and rekindle my own sad memories in respect of them, I do not know howto begin, nor yet how to continue and conclude my tale, for the handof heaven has been laid heavily upon me.
5.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Stranger, though a stillpoorer man should come here, it would not be right for me to insulthim, for all strangers and beggars are from Jove. You must take whatyou can get and be thankful, for servants live in fear when theyhave young lords for their masters; and this is my misfortune now, forheaven has hindered the return of him who would have been alwaysgood to me and given me something of my own- a house, a piece of land,a good looking wife, and all else that a liberal master allows aservant who has worked hard for him, and whose labour the gods haveprospered as they have mine in the situation which I hold. If mymaster had grown old here he would have done great things by me, buthe is gone, and I wish that Helen's whole race were utterly destroyed,for she has been the death of many a good man. It was this matter thattook my master to Ilius, the land of noble steeds, to fight theTrojans in the cause of kin Agamemnon."
6.  Then with both hands he took what Telemachus had sent him, andlaid it on the dirty old wallet at his feet. He went on eating itwhile the bard was singing, and had just finished his dinner as heleft off. The suitors applauded the bard, whereon Minerva went up toUlysses and prompted him to beg pieces of bread from each one of thesuitors, that he might see what kind of people they were, and tell thegood from the bad; but come what might she was not going to save asingle one of them. Ulysses, therefore, went on his round, goingfrom left to right, and stretched out his hands to beg as though hewere a real beggar. Some of them pitied him, and were curious abouthim, asking one another who he was and where he came from; whereon thegoatherd Melanthius said, "Suitors of my noble mistress, I can tellyou something about him, for I have seen him before. The swineherdbrought him here, but I know nothing about the man himself, norwhere he comes from."

计划指导

1.  But she would not give him full victory as yet, for she wished stillfurther to prove his own prowess and that of his brave son, so sheflew up to one of the rafters in the roof of the cloister and sat uponit in the form of a swallow.
2.  "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'
3.  Then Alcinous told Laodamas and Halius to dance alone, for there wasno one to compete with them. So they took a red ball which Polybus hadmade for them, and one of them bent himself backwards and threw itup towards the clouds, while the other jumped from off the groundand caught it with ease before it came down again. When they haddone throwing the ball straight up into the air they began to dance,and at the same time kept on throwing it backwards and forwards to oneanother, while all the young men in the ring applauded and made agreat stamping with their feet. Then Ulysses said:
4.  Furthermore she went to the house of Ulysses, and threw thesuitors into a deep slumber. She caused their drink to fuddle them,and made them drop their cups from their hands, so that instead ofsitting over their wine, they went back into the town to sleep, withtheir eyes heavy and full of drowsiness. Then she took the form andvoice of Mentor, and called Telemachus to come outside.
5.  Then the queen went back to her room upstairs, and her maids broughtthe presents after her. Meanwhile the suitors took to singing anddancing, and stayed till evening came. They danced and sang till itgrew dark; they then brought in three braziers to give light, andpiled them up with chopped firewood very and dry, and they lit torchesfrom them, which the maids held up turn and turn about. Then Ulyssessaid:
6.  And Ulysses answered, "King Alcinous, if you were to bid me tostay here for a whole twelve months, and then speed me on my way,loaded with your noble gifts, I should obey you gladly and it wouldredound greatly to my advantage, for I should return fuller-handedto my own people, and should thus be more respected and beloved by allwho see me when I get back to Ithaca."

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1.  "May it be even so," answered Penelope; "if your words come true youshall have such gifts and such good will from me that all who seeyou shall congratulate you; but I know very well how it will be.Ulysses will not return, neither will you get your escort hence, forso surely as that Ulysses ever was, there are now no longer any suchmasters in the house as he was, to receive honourable strangers orto further them on their way home. And now, you maids, wash his feetfor him, and make him a bed on a couch with rugs and blankets, that hemay be warm and quiet till morning. Then, at day break wash him andanoint him again, that he may sit in the cloister and take his mealswith Telemachus. It shall be the worse for any one of these hatefulpeople who is uncivil to him; like it or not, he shall have no more todo in this house. For how, sir, shall you be able to learn whetheror no I am superior to others of my sex both in goodness of heartand understanding, if I let you dine in my cloisters squalid and illclad? Men live but for a little season; if they are hard, and dealhardly, people wish them ill so long as they are alive, and speakcontemptuously of them when they are dead, but he that is righteousand deals righteously, the people tell of his praise among alllands, and many shall call him blessed."
2.  On this Eumaeus took his seat again, and when he had finished hisdinner he left the courts and the cloister with the men at table,and went back to his pigs. As for the suitors, they presently began toamuse themselves with singing and dancing, for it was now getting ontowards evening.
3.  Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."
4.  "In the end I deemed it would be the best plan to do as follows. TheCyclops had a great club which was lying near one of the sheep pens;it was of green olive wood, and he had cut it intending to use itfor a staff as soon as it should be dry. It was so huge that wecould only compare it to the mast of a twenty-oared merchant vessel oflarge burden, and able to venture out into open sea. I went up to thisclub and cut off about six feet of it; I then gave this piece to themen and told them to fine it evenly off at one end, which theyproceeded to do, and lastly I brought it to a point myself, charringthe end in the fire to make it harder. When I had done this I hid itunder dung, which was lying about all over the cave, and told themen to cast lots which of them should venture along with myself tolift it and bore it into the monster's eye while he was asleep. Thelot fell upon the very four whom I should have chosen, and I myselfmade five. In the evening the wretch came back from shepherding, anddrove his flocks into the cave- this time driving them all inside, andnot leaving any in the yards; I suppose some fancy must have takenhim, or a god must have prompted him to do so. As soon as he had putthe stone back to its place against the door, he sat down, milkedhis ewes and his goats all quite rightly, and then let each have herown young one; when he had got through with all this work, hegripped up two more of my men, and made his supper off them. So I wentup to him with an ivy-wood bowl of black wine in my hands:
5.   "Take heart, and do not trouble yourself about that," rejoinedMinerva, "let us rather set about stowing your things at once in thecave, where they will be quite safe. Let us see how we can best manageit all."
6.  "I was broken hearted when I heard that I must go back all that longand terrible voyage to Egypt; nevertheless, I answered, 'I will doall, old man, that you have laid upon me; but now tell me, and tell metrue, whether all the Achaeans whom Nestor and I left behind us whenwe set sail from Troy have got home safely, or whether any one of themcame to a bad end either on board his own ship or among his friendswhen the days of his fighting were done.'

应用

1.  "Be off, old man," he cried, "from the doorway, or you shall bedragged out neck and heels. Do you not see that they are all giving methe wink, and wanting me to turn you out by force, only I do notlike to do so? Get up then, and go of yourself, or we shall come toblows."
2.  "Thus did they speak and I assented. Thereon through the livelongday to the going down of the sun we feasted our fill on meat and wine,but when the sun went down and it came on dark the men laid themselvesdown to sleep in the covered cloisters. I, however, after I had gotinto bed with Circe, besought her by her knees, and the goddesslistened to what I had got to say. 'Circe,' said I, 'please to keepthe promise you made me about furthering me on my homeward voyage. Iwant to get back and so do my men, they are always pestering me withtheir complaints as soon as ever your back is turned.'
3.  "Then Mercury went back to high Olympus passing over the woodedisland; but I fared onward to the house of Circe, and my heart wasclouded with care as I walked along. When I got to the gates I stoodthere and called the goddess, and as soon as she heard me she camedown, opened the door, and asked me to come in; so I followed her-much troubled in my mind. She set me on a richly decorated seat inlaidwith silver, there was a footstool also under my feet, and she mixed amess in a golden goblet for me to drink; but she drugged it, for shemeant me mischief. When she had given it me, and I had drunk itwithout its charming me, she struck she, struck me with her wand.'There now,' she cried, 'be off to the pigsty, and make your lair withthe rest of them.'
4、  "Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of themagician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens,but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed herin the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
5、  "Hear me, men of Ithaca, I hope that you may never have a kind andwell-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern you equitably; Ihope that all your chiefs henceforward may be cruel and unjust, forthere is not one of you but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled you asthough he were your father. I am not half so angry with the suitors,for if they choose to do violence in the naughtiness of theirhearts, and wager their heads that Ulysses will not return, they cantake the high hand and eat up his estate, but as for you others I amshocked at the way in which you all sit still without even trying tostop such scandalous goings on-which you could do if you chose, foryou are many and they are few."

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  • 吴昌茂 08-04

      "Have we any idea, Antinous, on what day Telemachus returns fromPylos? He has a ship of mine, and I want it, to cross over to Elis:I have twelve brood mares there with yearling mule foals by their sidenot yet broken in, and I want to bring one of them over here and breakhim."

  • 汪柚子 08-04

      "Stranger," said he, "how suddenly you have changed from what youwere a moment or two ago. You are dressed differently and yourcolour is not the same. Are you some one or other of the gods thatlive in heaven? If so, be propitious to me till I can make you duesacrifice and offerings of wrought gold. Have mercy upon me."

  • 宁康园 08-04

       "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."

  • 崇俭 08-04

      "On this she went back to the house. The Phoenicians stayed awhole year till they had loaded their ship with much preciousmerchandise, and then, when they had got freight enough, they sentto tell the woman. Their messenger, a very cunning fellow, came tomy father's house bringing a necklace of gold with amber beadsstrung among it; and while my mother and the servants had it intheir hands admiring it and bargaining about it, he made a signquietly to the woman and then went back to the ship, whereon shetook me by the hand and led me out of the house. In the fore part ofthe house she saw the tables set with the cups of guests who hadbeen feasting with my father, as being in attendance on him; thesewere now all gone to a meeting of the public assembly, so she snatchedup three cups and carried them off in the bosom of her dress, whileI followed her, for I knew no better. The sun was now set, anddarkness was over all the land, so we hurried on as fast as we couldtill we reached the harbour, where the Phoenician ship was lying. Whenthey had got on board they sailed their ways over the sea, taking uswith them, and Jove sent then a fair wind; six days did we sail bothnight and day, but on the seventh day Diana struck the woman and shefell heavily down into the ship's hold as though she were a sea gullalighting on the water; so they threw her overboard to the seals andfishes, and I was left all sorrowful and alone. Presently the windsand waves took the ship to Ithaca, where Laertes gave sundry of hischattels for me, and thus it was that ever I came to set eyes uponthis country."

  • 高嵩 08-03

    {  THUS, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on tothe town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at thegateway, and her brothers- comely as the gods- gathered round her,took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into thehouse, while she went to her own room, where an old servant,Eurymedusa of Apeira, lit the fire for her. This old woman had beenbrought by sea from Apeira, and had been chosen as a prize forAlcinous because he was king over the Phaecians, and the people obeyedhim as though he were a god. She had been nurse to Nausicaa, and hadnow lit the fire for her, and brought her supper for her into herown room.

  • 成春梅 08-02

      THEN Mercury of Cyllene summoned the ghosts of the suitors, and inhis hand he held the fair golden wand with which he seals men's eyesin sleep or wakes them just as he pleases; with this he roused theghosts and led them, while they followed whining and gibberingbehind him. As bats fly squealing in the hollow of some great cave,when one of them has fallen out of the cluster in which they hang,even so did the ghosts whine and squeal as Mercury the healer ofsorrow led them down into the dark abode of death. When they hadpassed the waters of Oceanus and the rock Leucas, they came to thegates of the sun and the land of dreams, whereon they reached themeadow of asphodel where dwell the souls and shadows of them thatcan labour no more.}

  • 卜余年 08-02

      "'Be sure, therefore,' continued Agamemnon, 'and not be too friendlyeven with your own wife. Do not tell her all that you know perfectlywell yourself. Tell her a part only, and keep your own counsel aboutthe rest. Not that your wife, Ulysses, is likely to murder you, forPenelope is a very admirable woman, and has an excellent nature. Weleft her a young bride with an infant at her breast when we set outfor Troy. This child no doubt is now grown up happily to man's estate,and he and his father will have a joyful meeting and embrace oneanother as it is right they should do, whereas my wicked wife didnot even allow me the happiness of looking upon my son, but killedme ere I could do so. Furthermore I say- and lay my saying to yourheart- do not tell people when you are bringing your ship to Ithaca,but steal a march upon them, for after all this there is no trustingwomen. But now tell me, and tell me true, can you give me any newsof my son Orestes? Is he in Orchomenus, or at Pylos, or is he atSparta with Menelaus- for I presume that he is still living.'

  • 张开梅 08-02

      "My dear wife," replied Menelaus, "I see the likeness just as youdo. His hands and feet are just like Ulysses'; so is his hair, withthe shape of his head and the expression of his eyes. Moreover, when Iwas talking about Ulysses, and saying how much he had suffered on myaccount, tears fell from his eyes, and he hid his face in his mantle."

  • 方梦兰 08-01

       Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. When she deemed thatUlysses had had both of his wife and of repose, she badegold-enthroned Dawn rise out of Oceanus that she might shed light uponmankind. On this, Ulysses rose from his comfortable bed and said toPenelope, "Wife, we have both of us had our full share of troubles,you, here, in lamenting my absence, and I in being prevented fromgetting home though I was longing all the time to do so. Now, however,that we have at last come together, take care of the property thatis in the house. As for the sheep and goats which the wicked suitorshave eaten, I will take many myself by force from other people, andwill compel the Achaeans to make good the rest till they shall havefilled all my yards. I am now going to the wooded lands out in thecountry to see my father who has so long been grieved on my account,and to yourself I will give these instructions, though you have littleneed of them. At sunrise it will at once get abroad that I have beenkilling the suitors; go upstairs, therefore, and stay there withyour women. See nobody and ask no questions."

  • 布威海 07-30

    {  Ulysses looked sternly at him and answered, "If you were theirsacrificing priest, you must have prayed many a time that it mightbe long before I got home again, and that you might marry my wifeand have children by her. Therefore you shall die."

  • 奥特 07-30

      Ulysses went back to his own place, and Eumaeus strewed some greenbrushwood on the floor and threw a sheepskin on top of it forTelemachus to sit upon. Then the swineherd brought them platters ofcold meat, the remains from what they had eaten the day before, and hefilled the bread baskets with bread as fast as he could. He mixed winealso in bowls of ivy-wood, and took his seat facing Ulysses. Then theylaid their hands on the good things that were before them, and as soonas they had had enough to eat and drink Telemachus said to Eumaeus,"Old friend, where does this stranger come from? How did his crewbring him to Ithaca, and who were they?-for assuredly he did notcome here by land"'

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