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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:德米特里-梅德韦杰夫 大小:xgaZK4rS47945KB 下载:GzrBEXoh19843次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:hfNdRQib61849条
日期:2020-08-12 06:39:28
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索贝霍特普

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  So much of this powder had the Abbot provided, as should suffice forthree dayes entrancing, and having compounded it with a verypleasant Wine, calling Ferando into his Chamber, there gave it himto drinke, and afterward walked with him about the Cloyster, in veryfriendly conference together, the silly sot never dreaming on thetreachery intended against him. Many Monkes beside were recreatingthemselves in the Cloyster, most of them delighting to behold thefollies of Ferando, on whom the potion beganne so to worke, that heslept in walking, nodding and reeling as hee went, till at the last hefell downe, as if he had bene dead.
2.  Of all my hopes, the firme and full effect;
3.  The worshipfull Judge Messer Niccolao stood all this while on theground; and, in presence of all the beholders, trussed up hisBreeches, as if-hee were new risen out of his bed: when betterbethinking himselfe on the matters indifference, he called for the twomen, who contended for the drawing stockings and the Cloake-bag; butno one could tell what was become of them. Whereupon, he rapt out akinde of Judges oath, saying: I will know whether it be Law or noheere in Florence, to make a Judge sit bare Breecht on the Bench ofJustice, and in the hearing of criminall Causes; whereat the chiefePotestate, and all the standers by laughed heartily.
4.  And death (as yet) being deafe to all his earnest imprecations,delayed him on in lingering afflictions: and continuing still insuch an extreame condition, he was advised by some of his bestfriends, utterly to abstaine from this fond pursuit, because his hopeswere meerely in vaine, and Madam Catulla prized nothing moreprecious to her in the World, then unstayned loyaltie to herHusband: and yet shee lived in such extreame jealousie of him, asfearing least some bird flying in the ayre should snatch him from her.
5.  Most worthy Ladies, there wants no store of men and women, thatare so simple, as to credit for a certainty, that so soon as a yongvirgin hath the veile put on hir head, and the black Cowle given tocover withall, she is no longer a woman, nor more sensible of feminineaffections, then as if in turning Nun, shee became converted to astone. And if (perchance) they heard some matters, contrary to theirformer perswasion; then they grow so furiously offended, as if one hadcommitted a most foule and enormous sinne, directly against the courseof Nature. And the torrent of this opinion burries them on soviolently, that they wil admit no leisure to consider, how (in sucha scope of liberty) they have power to doe what they list, yeabeyond all meanes of sufficient satisfying, never remembring howpotent the priviledge of idlenes is, especially when it is backt bysolitude. In like manner, there are other people now, who verilybeleeve, that the Spade and Pickaxe, grosse feeding and labour, doquench al sensual and fleshly concupiscence, yea, in such as tilland husband the ground, by making them dull, blockish, and (almost)meere senslesse of understanding. But I will approve (according as theQueene hath commanded me, and within the compasse of her direction) bya short and pleasant Tale; how greatly they are abused by errour, thatbuild upon so weake a foundation.
6.  Or in my death listen my Swan-like Dittie.

计划指导

1.  His wages being small, and he not well contented therewith, wouldserve there no longer: but making his accounts even, with the Factotumor Bayliffe belonging to the house, returned thence to the villageof Lamporechio, being a native of the place. Among many other thatgave him welcom home, was a yong Hebrew pezant of the country, sturdy,strong and yet comely of person, being named Masset. But because hewas born not farre off from Lamporechio, and had there bin broughtup all his yonger dayes, his name of Masset (according to their vulgarspeech) was turnec to Massetto, and therefore he was usually calledand knowne by the name of Massetto of Lamporechio.
2.  Continuing long in this extreame affliction, and surveighing alllikely meanes about her, whereby she might descend from the Tarras,whereof she was wholly disappointed: she began to sighe and weepeexceedingly, and in this heavy perplexity of spirit, thus sheecomplained to her selfe. Miserable and unfortunate Helena, what willbe saide by thy Bretheren, Kindred, Neighbours, and generalliethroughout all Florence, when they shall know, that thou wast foundeheere on this Turret, starke naked? Thine honourable carriage, andhonesty of life, heeretofore free from a thought of suspition, shallnow be branded with detestation; and if thou wouldst cloud thismishappe of thine, by such lies and excuses, as are not rare amongstwomen: yet Reniero that wicked Scholler, who knoweth all thy privycompacting, will stand as a thousand witnesses against thee, and shamethee before the whole City, so both thine honor and loved friend arelost for ever.
3.  WHICH PLAINLY DECLARETH, THAT A COVETOUS GENTLEMAN, IS NOT
4.  When I did follow Dyans traine,
5.  But now concerning the third matter to be adventured, it drove herto a much more serious consideration, then those two which shee hadalready so well and exactly performed. Notwithstanding, like a Ladieof unconquerable spirit, and (in whom) Love enlarged his power moreand more: she sodainly conceited, what course was best to bee keptin this case, forming her attempt in this manner. Upon Nicostratuswayted two young Gentlemen, as Pages of his Chamber, whose Fathers hadgiven them to his service, to learne the manners of honourableCourtship, and those qualities necessarily required in Gentlemen.One of them, when Nicostratus sate downe to dinner or supper, stood inOffice of his Carver, delivering him all the meats whereon he fed. Theother (as Taster) attended on his Cup, and he dranke no otherdrinke, but what hee brought him, and they both were highly pleasingunto him.
6.  Such a sacred sweete,

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1.  As the ghost was offering to depart, Meucio remembred TingoccioesGossip Monna Mita, and raysing himselfe higher upon his pillowe, said.My memorie informeth me friend Tingoccio, your kinde Gossip MonnaMita, with whom (when you remained in this life) I knew you to be veryfamiliar: let me intreat you then to tell me, what punishment isinflicted on you there, for that wanton sinne committed heere? OhBrother Meucio, answered Tingoccio, so soone as my soule was landedthere, one came immediately to me, who seemed to know all mineoffences readily by heart, and forthwith commanded, that I shoulddepart thence into a certaine place, where I must weepe for mysinnes in very grievous paines. There I found more of my companions,condemned to the same punishment as I was, and being among them, Icalled to minde some wanton dalliances, which had passed betweene myGossip and me, and expecting therefore farre greater afflictions, thenas yet I felt (although I was in a huge fire, and exceedingly hot) yetwith conceite of feare, I quaked and trembled wondrously.
2.  Wearisome is my life to me, etc,
3.  After they had spent so much time in amorous discoursing, as mightbest fit with this their first meeting, and stand cleare fromsuspition on either side: our Albert Cupid, or Cupid Albert, whichof them you best please to terme him, closing his spangled wingestogether againe behinde his backe, fastening also on his Bow andQuiver of Arrowes, overclouds all with his religious Monkes Cowle, andthen with a parting kisse or two, returned to the place where he hadleft his fellow and companion, perhaps imployed in as devout anexercise, as he had bin in his absence from him; whence both repayringhome to the Monastery, all this nightes wandering was allowed astollerable, by them who made no spare of doing the like.On the morrow following, Madam Lisetta immediately after dinner,being attended by her Chamber-maid, went to see Friar Albert,finding him in his wonted forme and fashion, and telling him whathad hapned betweene her and God Cupid, with all the other lies andtales which hee had told her. Truly Madam (answered Albert) whatyour successe with him hath beene, I am no way able to comprehend; butthis I can assure you, that so soone as I had acquainted him with youranswer, I felt a sodaine rapture made of my soule, and visibly (tomy apprehension) saw it carried by Elves and Fairies, into thefloury fields about Elisium, where Lovers departed out of this life,walke among the beds of Lillies and Roses, such as are not in thisworld to be seene, neither to be imagined by any humane capacity. Sosuper-abounding was the pleasure of this joy and solace, that, howlong I continued there, or by what meanes I was transported hitheragaine this morning, it is beyond all ability in mee to expresse, orhow I assumed my body againe after that great God had made use thereofto your service. Well Fryar Albert (quoth shee) you may see what anhappinesse hath befalne you, by so grosse an opinion of myperfections, and what a felicity you enjoy, and still are like todo, by my pardoning your error, and granting the God accesse to mein your shape: which as I envy not, so I wish you heereafter to bewiser, in taking upon you to judge of beauty. Much other idle follyproceeded from her, which still he soothed to her contentment, and (asoccasion served) many meetings they had in the former manner.
4.  Being each of them endued with gentle spirits, and having beguntheir studies together: they arose (by degrees) to the glorious heightof Philosophy, to their much admired fame and commendation. In thismanner they lived, to the no meane comfort of Chremes, hardlydistinguishing the one from the other for his Son, and thus theSchollers continued the space of three yeares. At the ending wherof(as it hapneth in al things else) Chremes died, whereat both the youngGentlemen conceived such hearty griefe, as if he had bin theircommon father; nor could the kinred of Chremes discerne, which ofthe two had most need of comfort, the losse touched them so equally.
5.   The Fryars Boy, whom some called Guccio Balena, some Guccio Imbrata,and others Guccio Porco, was such a knavish Lad, and had so many badqualities, as Lippo Topo the cunning Painter, or the most curiousPoeticall wit, had not any ability to describe them. Friar Onyonhimself did often observe his behaviour, and would make this reportamong his Friends. My Boy (quoth he) hath nine rare qualities inhim, and such they are, as if Salomon, Aristotle, or Seneca hadonely but one of them: it were sufficient to torment and trouble alltheir vertue, all their senses, and all their sanctity. Consider then,what manner of man he is like to be, having nine such rarities, yetvoide of all vertue, wit, or goodnes. And when it was demaunded ofFriar Onyon, what these nine rare conditions were: hee having them allreadie by heart, and in rime, thus answered.
6.  Moreover, he knew how to speake, and do such things, as werebeyond wonder or admiration. And, never remembring his olde tatterdFriars Cowle, which was so snottie and greazie, that good store ofkitchin stuffe might have beene boiled out of it; as also a fouleslovenly Trusse or halfe doublet, all baudied with bowsing, fatgreazie lubberly sweating, and other drudgeries in the ConventKitchin, where he was an Officer in the meanest credite. So that todescribe this sweet youth in his lively colours, both for naturallperfections of body, and artificiall composure of his Garments;never came the fowlest silks out of Tartaria or India, more ugly orunsightly to bee lookt upon. And for a further addition to his neateknavery, his breeches were so rent betweene his legges, his shooes andstockings had bin at such a mercilesse massacre: that the gallantestCommandador of Castile (though he had never so lately bin releastout of slavery) could have wisht for better garments, then he; or makelarger promises, then he did to his Nuta. Protesting to entitle her ashis onely, to free her from the Inne and Chamber thraldomes, if shewould live with him, be his Love, partaker of his present possessions,and so to succeed in his future Fortunes. All which bravadoes,though they were belcht foorth with admirable insinuations: yet theyconverted into smoke, as all such braggadochio behaviours do, and hewas as wise at the ending, as when he began.

应用

1.  Beleeve mee Gentlewoman (speaking to the widdowe her selfe) itshould not appeare strange to any of wisedome and discretion, that Iam amorously enclined, and especially to you, because you are wellworthy of it. And although those powers, which naturally appertaine tothe exercises of Love, are bereft and gone from aged people; yetgood will thereto cannot be taken from them, neither judgement to knowsuch as deserve to be affected: for, by how much they exceede youth inknowledge and experience, by so much the more hath nature made themmeet for respect and reverence. The hope which incited me (being aged)to love you, that are affected of so many youthfull Gallants, grewthus. I have often chaunced into divers places, where I have seeneLadies and Gentlwomen, being disposed to a Collation or rerebanquetafter dinner, to feede on Lupines, and young Onions or Leekes, andalthough it may be so, that there is little or no goodnesse at allin them; yet the heads of them are least hurtfull, and most pleasingin the mouth. And you Gentlewomen generally (guided by unreasonableappetite) will hold the heads of them in your hands, and feede uponthe blades or stalkes: which not onely are not good for any thing, butalso are of very bad savour. And what know I (Lady) whether amongthe choise of friends, it may fit your fancy to doe the like? For,if you did so, it were no fault of mine to be chosen of you, butthereby were all the rest of your suters the sooner answered.
2.  Faire Grizelda, if I make you my wife, will you doe your bestendeavour to please me, in all things which I shall doe or say? willyou also be gentle, humble, and patient? with divers other the likequestions: whereto she still answered, that she would, so neere asheaven (with grace) should enable her.
3.  Extremity of griefe and sorrow, withheld his tongue from returningany answer, and she perceiving her end approaching, held the heartstill closer to her owne bare brest, saying; Here Fortune, receive twotrue hearts latest oblation; for, in this manner are we comming tothee. So closing her eyes, all sense forsooke her, life leaving herbody breathlesse. Thus ended the haplesse love of Guiscardo, andGhismonda, for whose sad disaster, when the King had mournedsufficiently, and repented fruitlesly; he caused both their bodiesto be honourably embalmed, and buried in a most royall Monument; notwithout generall sorrow of the subjects of Salerne.
4、  Hereupon, Saladine embracing him, and kissing his forehead, said.All my Gods goe with you, and guard you from any perill, departingso out of the Chamber weeping, and his Baschaes (having likewise takentheir leave of Thorello) followed Saladine into the Hall, whereasthe Bedde stood readily prepared? Because it waxed very late, andthe Magitian also there attending for his dispatch: the Phisitian wentwith the potion to Thorello, and perswading him, in the way offriendship, that it was onely to strengthen him after his greatweaknes: he drank it off, being thereby immediately entraunced, and sopresently sleeping, was (by Saladines command,) laid on thesumptuous and costly Bed, whereon stood an Imperiall Crowne ofinfinite value, appearing (by a description engraven on it) thatSaladine sent it to Madame Adalietta, the wife of Thorello. On hisfinger also hee put a Ring, wherein was enchased an admirableCarbuncle, which seemed like a flaming Torche, the value thereof notto bee estimated. By him likewise hee laid a rich sword, with thegirdle, hangers, and other furniture, such as seldome can be seene thelike. Then hee laid a jewell on the Pillow by him, so sumptuouslieembelished with Pearles and precious Stones, as might have beseemedthe greatest Monarch in the World to weare. Last of all, on eitherside of them, hee set two great Basons of pure Gold, full of doubleducates, many cords of Orient Pearles, Rings, Girdles, and othercostly jewells (over-tedious to bee recounted) and kissing him oncemore as hee lay in the bedde, commanded the Magitian to dispatch andbe gone.
5、  Oh poore infortunate Lovers, whose Starres were so inauspicious toyou, as to finish both your mortall lives, and fervent love, inlesse limitation then a dayes space. How to censure of your deaths,and happines to ensue thereon, by an accident so strange andinevitable: it is not within the compasse of my power, but to hope thebest, and so I leave you. But yet concerning Simonida her selfe, inthe common opinion of us that remaine living: her true vertue andinnocency (though Fortune was otherwise most cruell to her) wouldnot suffer her to sinke under the testimony of Strambo, Lagina,Atticciato, and Malagevole, being but carders of wool, or perhaps ofmeaner condition; a happier course was ordained for her, to passeclearely from their infamous imputation, and follow her Pasquino, inthe very same manner of death, and with such a speedy expedition.

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  • 辜波 08-11

      Gisippus lifting up his eyes, and perceiving it was Titus, conceivedimmediately, that he had done this onely for his deliverance, as onethat remembred him sufficiently, and would not be ungratefull forformer kindnesses received. Wherefore, the teares flowing abundantlydown his cheekes, he said to the Judge Varro, it was none but I thatmurdered the man, wherefore, I commiserate the case of this NobleGentleman Titus, who speakes now too late for the safety of my life.Titus on the other side, said. Noble Praetor, this man (as thou seest)is a stranger heere, and was found without any weapon, fast asleepe bythe dead body: thou mayst then easily perceive, that meerely themiserable condition wherein he is, hath made him desperate, and hewould make mine offence the occasion of his death. Absolve him, andsend me to the Crosse, for none but I have deserved to die for thisfact.

  • 高特莫勒 08-11

      And thought me happy, being in Love.

  • 刘汉杰 08-11

       Gisippus remaining still at Athens, in small regard of eyther theirsor his owne friends: not long after by meanes of sundry troublesomeCitizens; and partialities happening among the common people, wasbanished from Athens, and hee, as also all his familie, condemned toperpetuall exile: during which tempestuous time, Gisippus was becomenot onely wretchedly poore, but wandred abroad as a common begger;in which miserable condition he travelled to Rome, to try if Tituswould take any acknowledgement of him. Understanding that he wasliving, and one most respected among the Romanes, as being a greatCommander and a Senator: he enquired for the place where hee dwelt,and going to be neere about his house, stayed there so long, tillTitus came home, yet not daring to manifest himselfe, or speake a wordto him, in regard of his poore and miserable estate, but strove tohave him see him, to the end, that hee might acknowledge and callhim by his name; notwithstanding, Titus passed by him without eitherspeech, or looking on him: Which when Gisippus perceived, and makingfull account, that (at the least) he would remember him, in regardof former courtesies, done to him: confounded with griefe anddesperate thoughtes, hee departed thence, never meaning to see him anymore.

  • 盛隆 08-11

      That first enflam'd my heart with holy fire.

  • 嵇旭东 08-10

    {  In that most blissefull state,

  • 秦晓辉 08-09

      Nicostratus, who verily beleeved what they had both said, and thatneither of them would adventure such familiarity before his face:would talke no more of the matter, but rather studyed of the rarity ofsuch a miracle, not seene, but in the height of the tree, and changingagaine up on the descent. But Lydia, containing still hercollourable kinde of impatience, and angerly frowning uponNicostratus, stearnely saide. If I may have my will, this villanousand deceiving tree, shall never more shame me, or any other woman: andtherefore Pyrrhus, runne for an Axe, and by felling it to theground, in an instant, revenge both thy wrong and mine. Doest not thouserve a worthy Lord? And have not I a wise Husband, who, without anyconsideration, will suffer the eye of his understanding to be sodazeled, with a foolish imagination beyond all possibility? For,although his eyes did apprehend such a folly, and it seemed to be atruth indeed: yet, in the depth of setled judgement, all the worldshould not perswade him, that it was so.}

  • 安东尼·罗迈罗 08-09

      SHOULD BE GRANTED TO ANY ONE WHATSOEVER

  • 王丽梅 08-09

      THE SEVENTH DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL

  • 李立三 08-08

       At these wordes the Pilgrime sighed, and then proceeded on againethus. Surely Madame, this one onely sin, may justly torment you,because I know for a certainty, that Theobaldo never offered you anyin many, the day hee first became enamoured of you; and what graceor favour you affoorded him, was your owne voluntary gift, and (ashe tooke it) no more then in modesty might well become you; for heeloving you first, you had beene most cruell and unkinde, if you shouldnot have requited him with the like affection. If then he continued sojust and loyall to you, as (of mine owne knowledge) I am able to sayhe did; what should move you to repulse him so rudely? Such mattersought well to bee considered on before hand; for if you did imagine,that you should repent it as an action ill done, yet you could not doeit, because as hee became yours, so were you likewise onely his; andhe being yours, you might dispose of him at your pleasure, as beingtruely obliged to none but you. How could you then with-draw yourselfe from him, being onely his, and not commit most manifest theft, afarre unfitting thing for you to doe, except you had gone with hisconsent.

  • 休·杰克曼 08-06

    {  Come now likewise to the other side. What occasions could compellNoble Titus, so promptly and deliberatly, to procure his owne death,to rescue his friend from the crosse, and inflict the pain and shameupon himselfe, pretending not [to] see or know Gisippus at all, had itnot bin wrought by powerfull Amity? What cause else could make Titusso liberall, in dividing (with such willingnesse) the larger part ofhis patrimony to Gisippus, when Fortune had dispossest him of hisowne, but onely heaven-borne Amity? What else could have procuredTitus, without any further dilation, feare or suspition, to give hisSister Fulvia in marriage to Gisippus, when he saw him reduced to suchextreame poverty, disgrace and misery, but onely infinite Amity? Towhat end doe men care then, to covet and procure great multitudes ofkinred, store of brethren, numbers of children, and to encrease(with their owne monyes) plenty of servants: when by the least losseand dammage happening, they forget all duty to Father, Brother, orMaster? Amity and true friendship is of a quite contrary nature,satisfying (in that sacred bond) the obligation due to all degrees,both of parentage, and all alliences else.

  • 乐子 08-06

      The Ladies being thus at their owne disposing, some of them baredtheir legges and feete, to wash them in the coole current. Others, notso minded, walked on the greene grasse, and under the goodly spread:trees. Dioneus and Madame Fiammetta, they sate singing together, thelove-warre between Arcit and Palemon. And thus with diversity ofdisports, in choice delight and much contentment, all were imployed,till Supper drew neere. When the houre re come, and the Tables coveredby the Ponds side: we need not question their dyet and dainties,infinite Birds sweetly singing about them, as no musicke in theworld could be more pleasing; beside calme windes, fanning their facesfrom the neighbouring hilles (free from flyes, or the least annoyance)made a delicate addition to their pleasure.

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