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赢八网址是多少注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:蔡鹤皋 大小:j7Jg1yVG21120KB 下载:qBzTJh4177678次
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日期:2020-08-06 01:23:22
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谭华杰

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Sometime there lived in Sienna two popular men; the one beingnamed Tingoccio Mini, and the other Meucio de Tura; Men simple, and ofno understanding, both of them dwelling in Porta Salaia. These two menlived in such familiar conversation together, and expressed suchcordiall affection each to other, as they seldome walked asunder;but (as honest men use to doe) frequented Churches and Sermons,oftentimes hearing, both what miseries and beatitudes were in theworld to come, according to the merits of their soules that weredeparted out of this life, and found their equall repaiment in theother. The manifold repetition of these matters, made them veryearnestly desirous to know, by what meanes they might have tydingsfrom thence, for their further confirmation. And finding all theirendeavours utterly frustrated, they made a solemne vow and promise(each to other under oath) that hee which first dyed of them two,should returne backe againe (so soone as possibly he could) to theother remaining alive, and tell him such tydings as hee desired toheare.
2.  According as the people of Provence do report, there dweltsometime in that jurisdiction, two noble Knights, each wellpossessed of Castles and followers; the one being named MesserGuiglielmo de Rossiglione, and the other Messer GuiglielmoGuardastagno. Now, in regard that they were both valiant Gentlemen,and singularly expert in actions of Armes; they loved together themore mutually, and held it as a kinde of custome to be seene in allTiltes and Tournaments, or any other exercises of Armes, goingcommonly alike in their wearing garments. And although their Castlesstood about five miles distant each from other, yet were they daylyconversant together, as very loving and intimate friends. The one ofthem, I meane Messer Guiglielmo de Rossilione, had to wife a verygallant beautifull Lady, of whom Messer Guardastagno (forgetting thelawes of respect and loyall friendship) became overfondly enamoured,expressing the same by such outward meanes, that the Lady her selfetooke knowledge thereof, and not with any dislike, as it seemed, butrather lovingly entertained; yet she grew not so forgetfull of herhonour and estimation, as the other did of faith to his friend.
3.  But when hee came to pay his hoste, hee found not any penny lefthim: whereupon (as well he might) he grew greatly offended, and raisedmuch trouble in the house, charged the hoasts people to have robdehim, and threatening to have them sent as prisoners to Sienna.Suddenly entred Fortarigo in his shirt, with intent to have stolneAniollieroes garments, as formerly hee did the money out of his purse,and seeing him ready to mount on horsebacke, hee saide.
4.  THE SONG
5.  INSTRUCTIONS, CONCERNING THE UNSPEAKEABLE POWER OF LOVE
6.  Gentlemen and Gentlewomen, you know you have kept a commendablecustom, in sending yeerly to the poore brethren of our Lord Baron S.Anthony, both of your Corne and other provision, some more, somelesse, all according to their power, means, and devotion, to the endthat blessed S. Anthony should be the more carefull of your oxen,sheep, asses, swine, pigs, and other cattle. Moreover, you have usedto pay (especially such as have their names registred in ourFraternity) those duties which annually you send unto us. For thecollection whereof, I am sent by my Superior, namely our L. Abbot, andtherfore (with Gods blessing) you may come after noone hither, whenyou shal heare the Bels of the Church ring: then wil I make apredication to you; you shall kisse the Crosse, and beside, becauseI know you al to be most devout servants to our Lord Baron S. Anthony,in especiall grace and favor, I wil shew you a most holy and goodlyRelique, which I my selfe (long since) brought from the holy Landbeyond the seas. If you desire to know what it is, let me tell you,that it is one of the Feathers of the same Phoenix, which was in theArke with the Patriarch Noah. And having thus spoken, he becamesilent, returning backe to heare Masse. While hee delivered theseand the like speeches, among the other people then in the church,there were two shrewde and crafty Companions; the one, named John deBragoniero, and the other, Biagio Pizzino. These subtile Fellowes,after they had heard the report of Fryer Onyons Relique: althoghthey were his intimate friends, and came thither in his company; yetthey concluded betweene themselves, to shew him a tricke ofLegierdumaine, and to steale the Feather from him. When they hadintelligence of Friar Onyons dining that day at the Castle, with aworthy Friend of his: no sooner was he set at the Table, but away wentthey in all haste, to the Inne where the Fryar frequented, with thisdetermination, that Biagio should hold conference with the Friars boy,while his fellow ransackt the Wallet, to finde the Feather, andcarry it away with him, for a future observation, what the Friar wouldsay unto the people, when he found the losse of the Feather, and couldnot performe his promise to them.

计划指导

1.  It chanced on a day, that Alessandro rode somewhat neere to theAbbot, who stedfastly beholding him, perceived that he was a verycomely young man, so affable, lovely, and gracious, that even inthis first encounter, he had never seene any man before that betterpleased him. Calling him a little closer, he began to conferrefamiliarly with him, demanding what he was, whence he came, andwhether he travelled. Alessandro imparted freely to him all hisaffaires, in every thing satisfying his demands, and offering(although his power was small) to doe him all the service he could.
2.  By judgment of all the honorable assembly, it was reputedwonderfull, that a man should be so bountifull, as to give away hisowne life, and to his hatefull enemy. In which respect, it passed withgenerall affirmation, that Nathan (in the vertue of liberallity) hadexceeded Alphonso, King of Spain, but (especially) the Abbot ofClugny. So, after every one had delivered their opinion, the King,turning himselfe to Madame Lauretta, gave her such a signe, as wellinstructed her understanding, that she should be the next in order,whereto she gladly yeelding, began in this manner.
3.  Alas sweete Belcolore answered Sir Simon, I never beare any such sumabout me, for men of our profession, doe seldome carry any money atall: but beleeve me on my word, before Saturday come, I will not faileto bring them hither. Oh Sir (quoth Belcolore) you men are quickepromisers, but slow performers. Doe you thinke to use me, as pooreBillezza was, who trusted to as faire words, and found her selfedeceived? Now Sir Simon, her example in being made scandall to theworld, is a sufficient warning for me: if you be not so provided,goe and make use of your friend, for I am not otherwise to be moved.Nay Belcolore (quoth he) I hope you will not serve me so, but myword shall be of better worth with you. Consider the conveniency oftime, wee being so privately here alone: whereas at my returninghither againe, some hinderance may thwart me, and the like opportunitybe never obtained. Sir, she) you have heard my resolution; if you willfetche the Florines, doe; otherwise, walke about your businesse, for Iam a woman of my word.
4.  Signior Andrea, you are the most welcome friend to me in theworld; sealing this salutation with infinite sweet kisses andembraces: whereat (in wonderfull amazement) he being strangelytransported, replied; Madame, you honour me beyond all compasse ofmerit. Then, taking him by the hand, shee guided him thorough a goodlyHall, into her owne Chamber, which was delicately embalmed with Roses,Orenge flowers, and all other pleasing smelles, and a costly bed inthe middest, curtained round about, verie artificiall Picturesbeautifying the walles, with many other embellishments, such asthose Countries are liberally stored withall. He being meerely anovice in these kinds of wanton carriages of the World, and freefrom any base or degenerate conceite; firmely perswaded himselfe, that(questionlesse) she was a Lady of no meane esteeme, and he more thenhappy, to be thus respected and honored by her. They both being seatedon a curious Chest at the beds feete, teares cunningly trickling downeher Cheekes, and sighes intermedled with inward sobbings, breathedfoorth in sad, but verie seemely manner, thus shee beganne.
5.  After he had reade it, and well considered on the service thereinconcerned; he was the most joyfull man of the world, and began tocontrive his aptest meanes, for meeting with his gracious Mistresse,and according as she had given him direction. In a corner of the KingsPalace, it being seated on a rising hill, a cave had long beene madein the body of the same hill, which received no light into it, butby a small spiracle or vent-loope, made out ingeniously on the hilsside. And because it had not beene a long time frequented, by theaccesse of any body, that vent-light was over-growne with briars andbushes, which almost engirt it round about. No one could descendinto this cave or vault, but only by a secret paire of staires,answering to a lower Chamber of the Palace, and very neere to thePrincesse lodging, as being altogether at her command, by meanes ofa strong barred and defensible doore, whereby to mount or descend ather pleasure. And both the cave it selfe, as also the degreesconducting downe into it, were now so quite worne out of memory (inregard it had not beene visited by any one in long time before) asno man remembred that there was any such thing.
6.  By this time Ancilla was come thither, who so soone as shee wasentred into the Tower, could not refrain from teares and complaints,beating her hands each against other, and crying out. Madam, deareLady and Mistresse! Alas, Wher are you? So soone as she heard thetongue of Ancilla, she replyed (so well as she could) saying: Ah mysweet Woman, I am heere aloft uppon the Tarras; weepe not, neythermake any noyse, but quickely bring me some of my Garments. When sheeheard her answer in such comfortable maner, she mounted up the Ladder,which the peazant had made very firme and strong, holding it fastfor her safer ascending; by which meanes she went up on the Tarras.Beholding her Ladie in so strange a condition, resembling no humanebody, but rather the trunke of a Tree halfe burned, lying flat onher face, naked, scorched and strangely deformed: shee beganne toteare the lockes of her owne hayre, raving and raging in aspittifull manner, as if her Ladie had beene quite dead. Which stormingtempest, Madame Helena soone pacified, entreating her to usesilence, and helpe to put on her garments.

推荐功能

1.  THEIR WIVES, AS WELL AS MEN OF MEANER CONDITION
2.  Maestro Simone, an ydle-headed Doctor of Physicke, was throwne byBruno and Buffalmaco, into a common Leystall of Filth: The Physitianfondly beleeving, that (in the night time) he should bee made one of anew created Company, who usually went to see wonders at Corsica; andthere in the Leystall they left him.
3.  So parting; about the houre of dinner time, Guiotto went to thehouse of the saide Messer Corso, whom he found sitting and talkingwith certain of his neighbors, but dinner was not (as yet) ready,neither were they come thither to dinner. Messer Corso demaunded ofGuiotto, what newes with him, and whither he went? Why Sir (saidGuiotto) I come to dine with you, and your good company. Wherto MesserCorso answered, That he was welcom, and his other friends beinggone, dinner was served in, none els therat present but Messer Corsoand Guiotto: al the diet being a poore dish of Pease, a litle piece ofTunny, and a few smal fishes fried, without any other dishes to followafter. Guiotto seeing no better fare, but being disapointed of hisexpectation, as longing to feed on the Lampries and Sturgeon, and soto have made a ful dinner indeed: was of a quick apprehension, andapparantly perceived, that Blondello had meerly guld him in a knavery,which did not a litle vex him, and made him vow to be revenged onBlondello, as he could compasse occasion afterward.
4.  Now had they more leasure for further conference, with the Parentsand kindred to Ricciardo, who being no way discontented with thissudden match, but applauding it in the highest degree; they werepublikely maried againe in the Cathedrall Church, and veryhonourable triumphes performed at the nuptials, living long after inhappy prosperity.
5.   When the Queene perceived, that Madame Aemillia was discharged ofher Novell, and none remained now to speake next, but onely her selfe,his priviledge alwayes remembred, to whom it belonged to be thelast, she began in this manner.
6.  Well Wife, answered Talano, I knew well enough before, what thouwouldst say: An unsound head is soone scratcht with the verygentlest Combe: but beleeve as thou pleasest. As for my selfe, Ispeake with a true and honest meaning soule, and once againe I doadvise thee, to keepe within our doores all this day: at least wisebeware, that thou walke not into our wood, bee it but in regard ofmy dreame. Well sir (quoth she scoffingly) once you shall say, Ifollowed your counsell: but within her selfe she fell to thismurmuring. Now I perceive my husbands cunning colouring, and why Imust not walke this day into our wood: he hath made a compact withsome common Queane, closely to have her company there, and isafraide least I should take them tardy. Belike he would have me feedamong blinde folke, and I were worthy to bee thought a starke foole,if I should not prevent a manifest trechery, being intended againstme. Go thither therefore I will, and tarry there all the whole daylong; but I will meet with him in his merchandize, and see the Pinkwherin he adventures.

应用

1.  Tofano in the night season, did locke his wife out of his house, andshee not prevailing to get entrance againe, by all the entreatiesshe could possiblie use: made him beleeve that she had throwne herselfe into a Well, by casting a great stone into the same Well. Tofanohearing the fall of the stone into the Well, and being perswadedthat it was his Wife indeed; came forth of his house, and ran to theWelles side. In the meane while, his wife gotte into the house, madefast the doore against her Husband, and gave bim many reproachfullspeeches.
2.  Howbeit, to speake more properly, the matter by me to be reported,deserveth not the reproachfull title of deceite, but rather of arecompence duly returned: because women ought to be chaste and honest,and to preserve their honour as their lives, without yeelding to thecontamination thereof, for any occasion whatsoever. And yetneverthelesse (in regard of our frailty) many times we proove not soconstant as we should be: yet I am of opinion, that she whichselleth her honestie for money, deserveth justly to be burned. Whereason the contrary, she that falleth into the offence, onely throughintire affection (the powerfull lawes of Love beeing above allresistance) in equity meriteth pardon, especially of a Judge notover-rigorous: as not long since wee heard from Philostratus, inrevealing what hapned to Madam Phillippa de Prato, upon thedangerous Edict.
3.  But truth lives not in men,
4、  ALL MEN
5、  When the Abbot had heard his gentle answeres, so wisely anddiscreetly delivered, considering also (more particularly) hiscommendable carriage, hee tooke him to be (at the least) awell-borne Gentleman, and far differing from his owne logger headedtraine. Wherefore, taking compassion on his great misfortunes, hecomforted him very kindly, wishing him to live alwayes in good hope.For, if he were vertuous and honest, he should surely attaine to theseate from whence Fortune had throwne him, or rather much higher.Intreating him also, that seeing he journied towards Tuscany, as hehimselfe did the like, to continue stil (if he pleased) in hiscompany. Alessandro most humbly thanked him for such gracious comfort;protesting, that he would be alwaies readie to do whatsoever hecommanded.

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网友评论(thBRHlHo86999))

  • 陈光和 08-05

      In the Spring season,

  • 黄梁 08-05

      Nor is this desire of mine but upon great occasion, as thou thyselfe shalt perceive, if I prove accepted into your Societie, andlet me then be made a mocking stocke for ever, if I cause not tocome thither one of the most delicate young women, that ever anieeye beheld, and which I my selfe saw (not above a yeare since) atCacavinciglia, on whom I bestowed my intirest affection, and (by thebest Urinall that ever I gazed on) would have given her tenne faireBologninaes, to yeeld the matter I moved to her, which yet I could not(by any meanes) compasse. Therefore, with all the flowing faculties ofmy soule I entreate thee, and all the very uttermost of my allindeede; to instruct me in those wayes and meanes, whereby I mayhope to be a member of you. Which if thou dooest accomplish for me,and I may finde it effectually performed: I shall not onely be thytrue and loyall friend for ever, but will honour thee beside, beyondall men living.

  • 徐慧珠 08-05

       Afterward, they waited on her into the Hall againe, being their trueSoveraigne Lady and Mistresse, as she was no lesse in her poorestGarments; where all rejoycing for the new restored Mother, and happyrecovery of so noble a son and daughter, the Festivall continuedmany months after. Now every one thought the Marquesse to be a nobleand wise Prince, though somewhat sharpe and unsufferable, in thesevere experiences made of his wife: but (above al) they reputedGrizelda, to be a most wise, patient, and vertuous Lady. The Countof Panago, within few daies after returned backe to Bologna; and theLord Marques, fetching home old Janiculo from his country drudgery, tolive with him (as his Father in law) in his Princely Palace, gavehim honorable maintenance, wherein hee long continued, and ended hisdaies. Afterward, he matched his daughter in a Noble marriage: heand Grizelda living a long time together, in the highest honor thatpossibly could be.

  • 罗凤林 08-05

      Upon this his private frequentation with the Abbot, at last heobserved, that Ferando had a very beautifull woman to his Wife, withwhom he grew so deeply in love, as he had no other meditationseither by day or night, but how to become acceptable in her favour.Neverthelesse, he concealed his amorous passions privately tohimselfe, and could plainely perceive, that although Ferando (in allthings else) was meerely a simple fellow, and more like an Idiot, thenof any sensible apprehension: yet was he wise enough in loving hisWife, keeping her carfully out of all company, as one (indeede) veryjealous, least any should kisse her, but onely himselfe, which drovethe Abbot into despaire, for ever attaining the issue of his desire.Yet being subtill, crafty, and cautelous, he wrought so on theflexible nature of Ferando, that hee brought his wife with himdivers dayes to the Monasterie; where they walked in the goodlyGarden, discoursing on the beatitudes of eternall life, as also themost holy deedes of men and women, long since departed out of thislife, in mervailous civill and modest manner. Yet all these were buttraines to a further intention, for the Abbot must needes be herghostly Father, and she come to be confessed by him; which the fooleFerando tooke as an especiall favour, and therefore he gave hisconsent the sooner.

  • 姚增战 08-04

    {  You must put some friend in trust, to invite your Neighbors(especially such as you suspect) to a breakfast in the morning: andbecause it is done as a feast in kindnesse, they will come to youthe more willingly. This night will I and Buffalmaco take suchorder, that the Pilles shall have the charge imposed on them, and thenwee will bring them hither againe in the morning: and I, my selfe (foryour sake) will deliver them to your guests, and performe whatsoeveris to bee sayde or done. On the next morning, a goodly company beingassembled, under a faire Elme before the Church; as well youngFlorentynes (who purposely came to make themselves merry) asneighbouring Husbandmen of the Village: Bruno was to begin theservice, with the Pils in a faire Cup, and Buffalmaco followed himwith another Cup, to deliver the wine out of the Flaggon, all thecompany beeing set round, as in a circle; and Bruno with Buffalmacobeing in the midst of them, Bruno thus spake.Honest friends, it is fit that I should acquaint you with theoccasion, why we are thus met together, and in this place: becauseif anie thing may seeme offensive to you; afterward you shall makeno complaint of me. From Calandrino (our loving friend heerepresent) yesternight there was a new-kild fat Brawne taken, but whohath done the deede, as yet he knoweth not; and because none other,but some one (or more) heere among us, must needs offend in this case:he, desiring to understand who they be, would have each man to receiveone of these Pilles, and afterward to drinke of this Wine; assuringyou all, that whosoever stole the Brawne hence, cannot be able toswallow the Pill: for it wil be so extreme bitter in his mouth, asit will enforce him to Coughe and spet extraordinarily. In whichrespect, before such a notorious shame be received, and in so goodlyan assembly, as now are heere present: it were much better for himor them that have the Brawne, to confesse it in private to this honestPriest, and I will abstaine from urging anie such publike proofe.

  • 余娅 08-03

      little lesse then an Ideot; Hee was many times made Captain of theWoollen Weavers, in the quarters belonging to Santa Maria Novella, andhis house was the Schoole or receptacle, for all their meetings andassemblies. He had divers other petty Offices beside, by the gnity andauthority whereof, hee supposed himselfe much exalted or elevated,above the common pitch of other men. And this humour became the moretractable to him, because he addicted himselfe oftentimes (as beinga man of an easie inclination) to be a benefactor to the holyFathers of Santa Maria Novella, giving (beside his other charitableAlmes) to some one a paire of Breeches, to another a Hood, and toanother a whole habit. In reward whereof, they taught him (by heart)many wholsome prayers, as the Pater noster in the vulgar tongue; theSong of Saint Alexis; the Lamentations of Saint Bernard, the Hymneof Madame Matilda, and many other such like matters, which he keptcharily, and repeated usually, as tending to the salvation of hissoule.}

  • 杜汉 08-03

      Messer Geri well noting his behaviour, and observing the veriesame course in him two mornings together; on the third day (as hewas drinking) he said unto him. Well done Cistio, what, is it good, orno? Cistio starting up, forthwith replyed; Yes Sir, the wine is goodindeed, but how can I make you to beleeve me, except you taste ofit? Messer Geri, eyther in regard of the times quality, or by reasonof his paines taken, perhaps more then ordinary, or else, becausehee saw Cistio had drunke so sprightly, was very desirous to tasteof the Wine, and turning unto the Ambassadors, in merriment hesaide. My Lords, me thinks it were not much amisse, if we tooke ataste of this honest mans Wine, perhaps it is so good, that we shallnot neede to repent our labour.

  • 雷平 08-03

      Greatly were the Ladies minds perplexed, when they heard, that thetwo poore Lovers were in danger to be burned: but hearing afterward oftheir happy deliverance, for which they were as joyfull againe; uponthe concluding of the Novell, the Queene looked on Madame Lauretta,enjoyning her to tell the next Tale, which willingly she undertooke todo, and thus began.

  • 王素萍 08-02

       The Ladies and Gentlemen also, having smiled sufficiently at theseverall accidents which did befall the poore Traveller Andrea,reported at large by Madam Fiammetta, the Lady Aimillia seeing hertale to be fully concluded, began (by commandement of the Queene) tospeak in this manner.

  • 鲁斯兰 07-31

    {  The time being propitious for their parting thence, the Marinershoised their sayles, leaving the port of Alexandria, and saylingprosperously many dayes together. When they had past the Countrey ofSardinia, and (as they imagined) were well neere to their journeyesend; sodainely arose boysterous and contrary windes, which were soimpetuous beyond all measure, and so tormented the Ship wherein theLady was; that the Mariners seeing no signe of comfort, gave overall hope of escaping with life. Neverthelesse, as men most expert inimplacable dangers, they laboured to their uttermost power, andcontended with infinite blustring tempests, for the space of two dayesand nights together, hoping the third day would prove more favourable.But therein they saw themselves deceyved, for the violence continuedstill, encreasing in the night time more and more, being not any wayable to comprehend either where they were, or what course theytooke, neither by Marinall judgement, or any apprehension elsewhatsoever, the heavens were so clouded, and the nights darkenesseso extreame.Beeing (unknowne to them) neere the Isle of Majorica, they felt theShippe to split in the bottome: by meanes whereof, perceiving now nohope of escaping (every one caring for himselfe, and not any other)they threw foorth a Squiffe on the troubled waves, reposing moreconfidence of safety that way, then abiding any longer in the brokenship. Howbeit such as were first descended downe, made stoutresistance against all other followers, with their drawne weapons: butsafety of life so far prevayled, that what with the Tempests violence,and over lading of the Squiffe, it sunke to the bottome, and allperished that were therein. The Ship being thus split, and more thenhalfe full of water, tossed and tormented by the blustring windes,first one way, and then another: was at last driven into a strond ofthe Isle Majorica, no other persons therein remaining, but onely theLady and her women, all of them (through the rude tempest, and theirowne conceived feare) lying still, as if they were more then halfedead. And there, within a stones cast of the neighboring shore theship (by the rough surging billowes) was fixed fast in the sands,and so continued all the rest of the night, without any furthermolestation of the windes.

  • 罗建国 07-31

      Now (quoth the Monke) thou canst confesse thine owne wilfull follie,but this should have beene thought on before, and whilest thou wastliving in the World. But if the Fates vouchsafe to favour thee somuch, as hereafter to send thee to the World once more; remember thypunishment here in Purgatory, and sinne no more in that foule sinne ofjealousie. I pray you Sir tell me, replyed Ferando, after men aredead, and put into Purgatory, is there any hope of their ever visitingthe World any more? Yes, saide the Monke, if the fury of the Fatesbe once appeased. O that I knew (quoth Ferando) by what meanes theywould be appeased, and let me visite the World on againe: I would bethe best Husband that ever lived, and never more be jealous, neverwrong so good a Wife, nor ever use one unkind word against her. In themeane while, and till their anger may be qualified; when next myWife doth send me food, I pray you worke so much, that some Candlesmay be sent me also, because I live here in uncomfortabledarkenesse; and what should I doe with food, if I have no light.Shee sends Lights enow, answered the Monke, but they are burnt outon the Altar in Masse-time, and thou canst have none other here, butsuch as I must bring my selfe; neither are they allowed, but onely forthe time of thy feeding and correcting.

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