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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杰克-赫 大小:vW0Lvghx81828KB 下载:76NxQyWA34224次
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日期:2020-08-05 19:53:58
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Tofano perceyving how curstly they had handled him, and what crookedmeanes might further be used against him, in regard her Kindred andFriends were very mightie: thought it much better, patiently to sufferthe wrong alreadie done him, then by obstinate contending to proceedfurther, and fare worse. He became a suter to her Kindred, that almight be forgotten and forgiven, in recompence whereof; he would notonely refraine from drunkennesse, but also, never more be jelous ofhis wife. This being faithfully promised, and Cheta reconciled toher Husband, all strife was ended, she enjoyed her friends favour,as occasion served, but yet with such discretion, as it was not noted.Thus the Coxcombe foole, was faine to purchase his peace, after anotorious wrong sustained, and further injuries to bee offered.
2.  At which words, Messer Lizio stept forth from behind theCurtaines, saying. Nay, Signior Ricciardo, seeing you have foundsuch an unbefitting way hither, we will provide you a better foryour backe returning.
3.  WHEREIN MAY BEE NOTED, THAT SUCH MEN AS WILL REPROVE THOSE
4.  She going to the bed of Sage, reporting the whole precedent history,even from the originall to the ending: the better to make the caseunderstood, without the least colour of ill carriage towardesPasquino; according as she had seene him do, even so o she pluckeanother leafe of the Sage, rubbing her teeth therewith, and champingit as he formerly did. Strambo, and the other intimate friends ofPasquino, having noted in what manner she used the Sage, and thisappearing as her utmost refuge, either to acquit or condemne her: inpresence of the Judge they smiled thereat, mocking and deridingwhatsoever she saide, or did, and desiring (the more earnestly) thesentence of death against her, that her body might be consumed withfire, as a just punishment for her abhominable transgression.
5.  Lambertuccio sware many terrible oathes, to observe her directionsin every part, and having drawne forth his Sword, grasping it naked inhis hand, and setting worse lookes on the businesse, then evernature gave him, because he had spent so much labour in vaine; hefailed not in a jot of the Ladies injunction. Beltramo havingcommanded his horse to safe custody, and meeting Lambertucciodiscending downe the staires, so armed, swearing, and mostextreamely storming, wondring extraordinarily at his threatning words,made offer to imbrace him., and understand the reason of hisdistemper. Lambertuccio repulsing him rudely, and setting foote in thestirrup, mounted on his Gelding, and spake nothing else but this. Isweare by the fairest of all my fortunes, although I misse of theeheere: yet I will be sure to find thee some where else, and so hegallopped mainely away.
6.  By a fountaines side:

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1.  But, as oftentimes it commeth to passe, that such as are endued withthe best judgement and understanding in naturall occasions, aresoonest caught and intangled in the snares of Love: so fel it out withour Scholler Reniero, who being invited to a solemne Feast, in companyof other his especiall Friends; this Lady Helena, attyred in herblacke Garments (as Widowes commonly use to wear) was likewise there aGuest. His eye observing her beauty and gracious demeanour, she seemedin his judgement, to be a Woman so compleate and perfect, as he hadnever seene her equall before: and therefore, he accounted the manmore then fortunate, that was worthy to embrace her in his armes.Continuing this amorous observation of her from time to time, andknowing withall, that rare and excellent things are not easilyobtained, but by painefull study, labour, and endeavour: heeresolved with himselfe constantly, to put in practise all his bestparts of industry, onely to honour and please her, and attaining toher contentation, it would be the means to winne her love, andcompasse thereby his hearts desire.
2.  Such was the apprehension of this witty Lady, that these wordsseemed to taxe her honour, or else to contaminate the hearersunderstanding, whereof there were great plenty about her, whosejudgement might be as vile, as the speeches were scandalous.Wherefore, never seeking for any further purgation of her cleareconscience, but onely to retort taunt for taunt, presently thus shereplied. My Lord, if I should make such a vile adventure, I wouldlooke to bee payde with better money.
3.  Gulfardo made a match or wager, with the Wife of Gasparuolo, for theobtaining of her amorous favour, in regard of a summe of money firstto be given her. The money hee borrowed of her Husband, and gave it inpayment to her, as in case of discharging him from her Husbandsdebt. After his returne home from Geneway, hee told him in thepresence of his wife, how he had payde the whole summe to her, withcharge of delivering it to her Husband, which she confessed to betrue, albeit greatly against her will.
4.  And joy in thy Captivitie:
5.  When the Pilgrim had finished his speeches, the Gentlewoman whohad listned to them very attentively (because all the edged reasonsappeared to be plainly true) became verily perswaded, that all theseafictions had falne on her and her father, for the ingratefull offenceby her committed, and therefore thus is replied. Worthy man, and thefriend to goodnesse, I know undoubtedly, that the words which you havespoken are true, and also I understand by your demonstration, whatmanner of people some of those religious persons are, whomheretofore I have reputed to be Saints, but find them now to be farotherwise. And to speake truly, I perceive the fault to be great andgreevous, wherein I have offended against Theobaldo, and would (if Icould) willingly make amends, even in such manner as you have advised.But how is it possible to be done? Theobaldo being dead, can be [no]more recalled to this life; and therefore, I know not what promise Ishould make, in a matter which is not to bee performed. Whereto thePilgrime without any longer pausing, thus answered.
6.  Master Doctour, you have lived both at Bologna, and heere in thesepartes with us, having (no doubt) sufficiently understoode, what it isto carry a close mouth, I meane the true Charracter of taciturnitie.Questionlesse, you never learned the A. B. C. as now foolish Ideotsdo, blabbing their lessons all about the towne, which is much betterapprehended by rumination; and surely (if I be not much deceyved) yourNativity happened on a Sonday morning, Sol being at that time, Lord ofthe ascendent, joyned with Mercurie in a fierie Triplicitie. By suchconference as I have had with Bruno, I conceyved (as he himselfealso did) that you were verie singular in Physicke onely: but itseemeth, your Studies reached a higher straine, for you havelearned, and know verie skilfullie, how to steale mens hearts fromthem, yea, to bereave them of their verie soules, which I perceyvethat you can farre better doe, then any man else living to myknowledge, only by your wise, witty, judicious, and more then meereMercurian eloquence, such as I never heard before.

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1.  Manutio, I have made choyce of thee, to be the faithfull Guardian ofan especial secret, hoping first of al, that thou wilt never revealeit to any living body, but onely to him whom I shall bid thee: Andnext, to helpe me so much as possibly thou canst, because my onelyhope relyeth in thee. Know then my dearest friend Manutio, that on thesolemne festivall day, when our Soveraigne Lord the King honouredhis exaltation, with the noble exercises of Tilt and Turney; his bravebehaviour kindled such a sparke in my soule, as since brake forth intoa violent flame, and brought me to this weake condition as now thouseest. But knowing and confessing, how farre unbeseeming my love is,to aime so ambitiously at a King, and being unable to controule it, orin the least manner to diminish it: I have made choyce of the onelyand best remedy of all, namely, to dye, and so I am most willing todoe.
2.  No sooner was he come neere, but they all arose, and courteouslyinvited him to enter with them, conducting him into a goodly Garden,where readily was prepared choyse of delicate wines and banquetting.At length, among other pleasant and delightfull discourses, theydemanded of him; how it was possible for him, to be amorously affectedtowards so beautifull a woman, both knowing and seeing, howearnestly she was sollicited by many gracious, gallant, andyouthfull spirits, aptly suting with her yeares and desires? MasterAlbert perceiving, that they had drawne him in among them, onely toscoffe and make a mockery of him; set a merry countenance on thematter, and honestly thus answered.
3.  THE SEVENTH DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL
4.  A yong Scholler, named Felice, enstructed Puccio di Rinieri, howto become rich in a very short time. While Puccio made experience ofthe instructions taught him; Felice obtained the favour of hisDaughter.
5.   So putting on his Pilgrimes habit againe, kissing her once more, andcomforting her with future good successe, he departed from her,going to the prison where Aldobrandino lay, whom hee found morepensive, as being in hourely expectation of death, then any hope hehad to be freed from it. Being brought neerer to him by theprisoners favour, as seeming to be a man come onely to comfort him:sitting downe by him, thus he began. Aldobrandino, I am a friend ofthine, whom Heaven hath sent to doe thee good, in meere pittie andcompassion of thine innocency. And therefore, if thou wilt grant meone small request, which I am earnestly to crave at thy hands, thoushalt heare (without any failing) before to morrow at night, thesentence of thy free absolution, whereas now thou expectest nothingbut death; whereunto Aldobrandino thus answered. Friendly man,seeing thou art so carefull of my safety (although I know thee not,neither doe remember that ere I saw thee till now) thou must needsbe some especiall kinde friend of mine. And to tell thee the truth,I never committed the sinful deed for which I am condemned to death.True it is, I have other heinous and greevous sins, which(undoubtedly) have throwne. this heavy judgement on me, andtherefore I am the more willing to undergo it. Neverthelesse, let methus I us farre assure thee, that I would gladly not onely promisesomething which might be to the glory of God, if he were pleased inthis case to have mercy on me; but also would as willingly performeand accomplish it. Wherefore, demaund whatsoever thou pleasest, forunfained (if I escape with life) I will truly keepe promise with thee.
6.  Signiour Thorello, with a number of his honourable Friends (to thenumber of an hundred Horsse) accompanied them a great distance fromthe Citie, and although it greeved Saladine exceedingly, to leavethe company of Thorello, so dearely he was affected to him: butnecessity (which controlleth the power of all lawes whatsoever) mustneeds divide them: yet requesting his returne agayne that way, ifpossibly it might be granted; which Saladine promised but did notperforme. Well Gentlemen (quoth Thorello at parting) I know not whatyou are, neither (against your will) do I desire it: but whether yoube Marchants or no remember me in your kindnesse, and so to theheavenly powers I commend you. Saladine, having taken his leave of allthem that were with Thorello, returned him this answer. Sir, it mayone day hereafter so happen, as we shal let you see some of ourMarchandises, for the better confirmation of your beleefe, and ourprofession.

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1.  Her spirits being in better manner met together, and she stillgazing every way about her, not knowing well where she was, and secingSignior Gentile standing before her: he entreated his mother to tellher by what meanes she came thither; which the good old Lady did,Gentile himselfe helping to relate the whole history. A while shegrieved and lamented, but afterward gave them most hearty thankes,humbly requesting, that, in regard of the love he had formerly borneher, in his house she might finde no other usage, varying from thehonour of her selfe and her Husband, and when day was come, to beconveighed home to her owne house. Madame, answered Signior Gentile,whatsoever I sought to gaine from you in former dayes, I nevermeane, either here, or any where else, to motion any more. Butseeing it hath been my happy fortune, to prove the blessed means ofreducing you from death to life: you shal find no otherentertainment here, then as if you were mine owne Sister. And yetthe good deed which I have this night done for you doth welldeserve some courteous requitall: in which respect, I would have younot to deny me one favour, which I will presume to crave of you.Whereto the Lady lovingly replyed, that she was willing to grant it;provided, it were honest, and in her power: whereto Signior Gentilethus answered.
2.  Chichibio perceiving, that his Masters anger was not (as yet)asswaged, and now it stood him upon, to make good his lye; not knowinghow he should do it, rode after his Master, fearfully trembling allthe way. Gladly he would have made an escape, but hee could not by anypossible meanes, and on every side he looked about him, now before,and after behinde, to espy any Cranes standing on both their legges,which would have bin an ominous sight to him. But being come neereto the River, he chanced to see (before any of the rest) upon thebanke thereof, about a dozen Cranes in number, each of them standingbut upon one legge, as they use to do when they are sleeping.Whereupon, shewing them quickly to Messer Currado, he said. Now Siryour selfe may see, whether I told you true yesternight, or no: I amsure a Crane hath but one thigh, and one leg, as all here presentare apparant witnesses, and I have bin as good as my promise.
3.  But why do I trouble you with the repetition of so many countries? Icoasted on still, after I had past Saint Georges Arme, into Truffia,and then into Buffia which are Countries much inhabited, and withgreat people. From thence I went into the Land of Lying, where I foundstore of the Brethren of our Religion, and many other beside, whoshunned all paine and labour, onely for the love of God, and caredas little, for the paines and travailes which others tooke, exceptsome benefit arised thereby to them; nor spend they any money inthis Country, but such as is without stampe. Thence I went into theLand of Abruzzi, where the men and women goe in Galoches over theMountaines, and make them garments of their Swines guts. Not farrefrom thence, I found people, that carried bread in their staves, andwine in Satchels, when parting from them, I arrived among theMountaines of Bacchus, where all the waters run downe with a deepefall, and in short time, I went on so far, that I found my selfe to bein India Pastinaca; where I swear to you by the holy habit which Iweare on my body, that I saw Serpents Bye, things incredible, and suchas were never seene before.But because I would be loth to lye, so soone as I departed thence,I met with Maso de Saggio, who was a great Merchant there, and whomI found cracking Nuts, and selling Cockles by retale. Neverthelesse,al this while I could not finde what I sought for, and therefore I wasto passe from hence by water, if I intended to travaile thither, andso into the Holy Land, where coole fresh bread is sold for fourepence, and the hot is given away for nothing. There I found thevenerable Father (blame me not I beseech you) the most woorthiePatriarch of Jerusalem, who for the reverence due to the habite Iweare, and love to our Lord Baron Saint Anthony, would have me tosee al the holy Reliques, which he had there under his charge:wherof there were so many, as if I should recount them all to you, Inever could come to a conclusion. But yet not to leave youdiscomforted, I will relate some few of them to you. First of all,he shewed me the finger of the holy Ghost, so whole and perfect, asever it was. Next, the nose of the Cherubin, which appeared to SaintFrances; with the payring of the naile of a Seraphin; and one of theribbes of Verbum caro, fastened to one of the Windowes' covered withthe holy garments of the Catholique Faith. Then he tooke me into adarke Chappel, where he shewed me divers beames of the Starre thatappeared to the three Kings in the East. Also a Violl of SaintMichaels sweate, when he combatted with the divell: And the jaw-boneof dead Lazarus, with many other precious things beside. And because Iwas liberall to him, giving him two of the Plaines of Monte Morello,in the Vulgare Edition, and some of the Chapters del Caprezio, whichhe had long laboured in search of; he bestowed on me some of hisReliques. First, he gave me one of the eye-teeth of Santa Crux; anda litle Violl, filled with some part of the sound of those Belles,which hung in the sumptuous Temple of Salomon. Next, he gave mee theFeather of the Phoenix, which was with Noah in the Arke, as before Itold you. And one of the Woodden Pattens, which the good Saint Gerrardde Magnavilla used to weare in his travailes, and which I gave (notlong since) to Gerrardo di Bousy at Florence, where it is respectedwith much devotion. Moreover, he gave me a few of those Coales,wherwith the Phoenix of Noah was roasted; all which things I broughtaway thence with me. Now, most true it is, that my Superiour wouldnever suffer mee to shew them any where, untill he was faithfullycertified, whether they were the same precious Reliques, or no. Butperceyving by sundrie Myracles which they have wrought, and Letters ofsufficient credence receyved from the reverend Patriarch, that allis true, he hath graunted me permission to them, and because I woldnot trust any one with matters of such moment, I my selfe brought themhither with me. Now I must tell you, that the Feather of the samePhoenix, I conveyed into a small Cabinet or Casket, because itshould not be bent or broken. And the Coales wherewith the saidPhoenix was roasted, I put into another Casket, in all respects solike to the former, that many times I have taken one for another. Asnow at this instant it hath bin my fortune: for, imagining that Ibrought the Casket with the feather, I mistooke my self, and broughtthe other with the coales. Wherein doubtles I have not offended,because I am certaine, that we of our Order do not any thing, but itis ordred by divine direction, and our blessed Patron the LordeBaron Saint Anthony. And so much the rather, because about a senighthence, the Feast of Saint Anthony is to bee solemnized, against thepreparation whereof, and to kindle your zeale with the greaterfervencie: he put the Casket with the Coales into my hand, meaning,let you see the Feather, at some more fitting season. And therefore myblessed Sonnes and Daughters, put off your Bonnets, and come hitherwith devotion to looke upon them. But first let me tell you, whosoeveris marked by any of these Coales, with the signe of the Crosse: heor she shal live all this yeare happily, and no fire whatsoevershall come neere to touch or hurt them. So, singing a solemneAntheme in the praise of S. Anthony, he unveyled the Casket, andshewed the Coales openly.The simple multitude, having (with great admiration and reverence)a long while beheld them, they thronged in crouds to Fryar Onyon,giving him farre greater offerings, then before they had, andentreating him to marke them each after other. Whereupon, he takingthe coales in his hand, began to marke their garments of white, andthe veyles on the Womens heads, with Crosses of no meane extendure:affirming to them, that the more the Coales wasted with making thosegreat crosses, the more they still encreased in the Casket, as oftenbefore hee had made triall.
4、  Counterfeit teares still drayning downe her cheeks, and Salabettokindly comforting her; he continued there with hir all that night,to expresse him selfe her most liberall servant. And, withoutexpecting any more requesting, the next morning he brought her thefive hundred Florines, which she received with a laughing heart, butoutward dissembled weeping eies; Salabetto never demanding any othersecurity, but onely her single promise.
5、  Ricciardo durst not speake one word, but still expressed his affablebehaviour towards her, bestowing infinite embraces and kisses onher: which so much the more augmented her rage and anger, continuingon her chiding thus. If by these flatteries and idle follies, thouhopest to comfort or pacifie me, thou runnest quite by as from thyreckoning; for I shall never imagine my selfe halfe satisfied,untill in the presence of my parents, friends, and neighbours, Ihave revealed thy base behaviour. Tell mee, treacherous man, am notI as faire, as the wife of Ricciardo? Am I not as good a Gentlewomanborne, as shee is? What canst thou more respect in her, then is inmee? Villaine, monster, why doest thou not answere mee? I will send toRicciardo, who loveth mee beyond all other women in Naples, and yetcould never vaunt, that I gave him so much as a friendly looke: heshall know, what a dishonour thou hadst intended towards him; whichboth he and his friends will revenge soundly upon thee. Theexclamations of the Lady were so tedious and irksome, that Ricciardoperceiving, if shee continued longer in these complaints, worsewould ensue thereon, then could bee easily remedied: resolved tomake himselfe knowne unto her, to reclaime her out of this violentextasie, and holding her somewhat strictly, to prevent her escapingfrom him, he said. Madam, afflict your selfe no further, for, what Icould not obtaine by simply loving you, subtilty hath better taughtme, and I am your Ricciardo: which she hearing, and perfectlyknowing him by his voyce; shee would have leapt out of the Bath, butshee could not, and to avoyde her crying out, he layde his hand on hermouth, saying. Lady, what is done, cannot now be undone, albeit youcried out all your life time. If you exclaime, or make this knowneopenly by any meanes; two unavoydable dangers must needes ensuethereon. The one (which you ought more carefully to respect) is thewounding of your good renowne and honour, because, when you shall say,that by treacherie I drew you hither: I will boldly maintaine thecontrary, avouching, that having corrupted you with gold, and notgiving you so much as covetously you desired; you grew offended, andthereon made the outcry, and you are not to learne, that the worldis more easily induced to beleeve the worst, then any goodnesse, be itnever so manifest. Next unto this, mortall hatred must arisebetweene your husband and mee, and (perhaps) I shall as soone killhim, as he me; whereby you can hardly, live in any true contentmentafter. Wherefore, joy of my life, doe not in one moment, both shameyour selfe, and cause such perill betweene your husband and me: foryou are not the first, neither can be the last, that shall bedeceived. I have not beguiled you, to take any honour from you, butonely declared, the faithfull affection I beare you, and so shalldoe for ever, as being your bounden and most obedient servant; andas it is a long time agoe, since I dedicated my selfe and all mineto your service, so hence-forth must I remaine for ever. You arewise enough (I know) in all other things: then shew your selfe notto be silly or simple in this.

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  • 宣华华 08-04

      Ischia is an Iland very neere to Naples, wherein (not long since)lived a faire and lovely Gentlewoman, named Restituta, Daughter to aGentleman of the same Isle, whose name was Marino Bolgaro. A properyouth called Guion, dwelling also in a neere neighbouring Isle, calledProcida, did love her as dearly as his owne life, and she was asintimately affected towards him. Now because the sight of her washis onely comfort, as occasion gave him leave, he resorted to Ischiavery often in the day time, and as often also in the night season,when any Barke passed from Procida to Ischia; if to see nothingelse, yet to behold the walles that enclosed his Mistresse thus.

  • 吴朝晖 08-04

      She beleeving verily that he was Gisippus, modestly answered. Sir, Ihave chosen you to be my Husband, reason requires then, that Ishould be willing to be your wife. At which words, a costly Ring,which Gisippus used daily to weare, he put upon her finger, saying.With this Ring, I confesse my selfe to be your Husband, and bind you(for ever) my Spouse and Wife; no other kind of marriage wasobserved in those dayes, and so he continued all the night with her,she never suspecting him to be any other then Gisippus, and thus wasthe marriage consumated, betweene Titus and Sophronia, albeit thefriends (on either side) thought otherwise.

  • 何理锋 08-04

       THE THIRD DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL

  • 陆基 08-04

      Gracious ladies, it may be you have not heard how the Devil is putin Hell. Therefore, and since it will not be far off the subject ofthis day's discourse, I will tell it you. Perhaps, hearing it, you maythe better understand that albeit Love more affects gay palaces andluxurious bowers than the cabins of the poor, yet he by no meansdisdains to manifest his power even in the depths of the forest, onstark mountains and in the caves of the desert; and thus we mustacknowledge that all things wheresoever they be are subject to him.

  • 奥斯卡尔·科纽霍夫 08-03

    {  Doest thou imagine Husband, that if I were so blinded in the eyes ofmy head, as thou art in them which should informe thine understanding;I could have found out the Priest, that would needs bee myConfessor? I knew thee Husband to be the man, and therefore I preparedmy wit accordingly, to fit thee with the foolish imagination whichthou soughtest for, and (indeed) gave it thee. For, if thou hadstbeene wise, as thou makest the world to beleeve by outwardapparance, thou wouldest never have expressed such a basenesse ofminde, to borrow the coulour of a sanctified cloake, thereby toundermine the secrets of thine honest meaning Wife. Wherefore, tofeede thee in thy fond suspition, I was the more free in myConfession, and tolde thee truely, with whom, and how heinously Ihad transgressed. Did I not tell thee, that I loved a Fryar? And artnot thou he whom love, being a Fryar, and my ghostly Father, though(to thine owne shame) thou madst thy selfe so? I said moreover, thatthere is not any doore in our house, that can keepe it selfe shutagainst him, but (when he pleaseth) he comes and lies with me. Nowtell me Husband, What doore in our house hath (at any time) bin shutagainst thee, but they are freely thine owne, and grant thee entrance?Thou art the same Friar that confest me, and lieth every night withme, and so often as thou sentst thy yong Novice or Clearke to me, asoften did I truly returne thee word, when the same Fryar lay withme. But (by jealousie) thou hast so lost thine understanding, thatthou wilt hardly beleeve all this.

  • 玛丽莲-梦露 08-02

      WHEREIN, THE SEVERALL POWERS BOTH OF LOVE AND FORTUNE, IS}

  • 刘腾 08-02

      After I had continued some time among them, and learned a littleof their language; they asked me, of whence, and what I was. Reasongave me so much understanding, to be fearefull of telling them thetrueth, for feare of expulsion from among them, as an enemy to theirLaw and Religion: wherefore I answered (according as necessitie urged)that I was daughter to a Gentleman of Cyprus who sent me to beemarried in Candie; but our fortunes (meaning such as had the charge ofme) fell out quite contrary to our expectation, by losses, shipwracke,and other mischances; adding many matters more beside, onely in regardof feare, and yeelding obediently to observe their customes.

  • 白殿文 08-02

      That I died true, and constant in my Love.

  • 安东尼·埃文斯 08-01

       Sir, it is no meane charge which you are to undergo, in makingamends (perhaps) for all the faults committed by my selfe and therest, who have gone before you in the same authority; and, may itprove as prosperous unto you, as I was willing to create you our King.Pamphilus having received the Honor with a chearfull mind, thusanswered. Madam, your sacred vertues, and those (beside) remainingin my other Subjects, will (no doubt) worke so effectually for me,that (as the rest have done) I shall deserve your generall goodopinion. And having given order to the Master of the Houshold (asall his predecessors had formerly done, for every necessaryoccasion; he turned to the Ladies, who expected his gracious favour,and said.

  • 羊光然 07-30

    {  Thus parted Signior Thorello and his friends, from Saladine andhis company, who verily determined in the heighth of his minde, ifhe should be spared with life, and the warre (which he expected)concluded: to requite Thorello with no lesse courtesie, then hee hadalready declared to him; conferring a long while after with hisBaschaes, both of him and his beauteous Lady, not forgetting any oftheir courteous actions, but gracing them all with deservedcommendation. But after they had (with very laborious paines) surveyedmost of the Westerne parts, they all tooke Shipping, and returned intoAlexandria: sufficiently informed, what preparation was to be made fortheir owne defence. And Signior Thorello being come backe againe toPavia, consulted with his privat thoughts (many times after) whatthese three travailers should be, but came farre short of knowingthe truth, till (by experience) hee became better informed.

  • 吴文斌 07-30

      Well may I curse that sad and dismall day,

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