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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:拉姆斯菲尔德 大小:saSVfTtB56002KB 下载:hRIobD9f12226次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:Wvzh34Et94499条
日期:2020-08-12 06:23:59
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胡思

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Old man," answered Ulysses, "she knows already, so you need nottrouble about that." On this he took his seat, and the sons ofDolius gathered round Ulysses to give him greeting and embrace him oneafter the other; then they took their seats in due order near Doliustheir father.
2.  Meanwhile the daughter of Icarius, wise Penelope, had had had a richseat placed for her facing the court and cloisters, so that shecould hear what every one was saying. The dinner indeed had beenprepared amid merriment; it had been both good and abundant, forthey had sacrificed many victims; but the supper was yet to come,and nothing can be conceived more gruesome than the meal which agoddess and a brave man were soon to lay before them- for they hadbrought their doom upon themselves.
3.  So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had gotsafely home except Ulysses, and he, though he was longing to return tohis wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had gothim into a large cave and wanted to marry him. But as years went by,there came a time when the gods settled that he should go back toIthaca; even then, however, when he was among his own people, histroubles were not yet over; nevertheless all the gods had now begun topity him except Neptune, who still persecuted him without ceasingand would not let him get home.
4.  "I am not surprised, my dear mother, at your displeasure," repliedTelemachus, "I understand all about it and know when things are not asthey should be, which I could not do when I was younger; I cannot,however, behave with perfect propriety at all times. First one andthen another of these wicked people here keeps driving me out of mymind, and I have no one to stand by me. After all, however, this fightbetween Irus and the stranger did not turn out as the suitors meant itto do, for the stranger got the best of it. I wish Father Jove,Minerva, and Apollo would break the neck of every one of thesewooers of yours, some inside the house and some out; and I wish theymight all be as limp as Irus is over yonder in the gate of the outercourt. See how he nods his head like a drunken man; he has had sucha thrashing that he cannot stand on his feet nor get back to his home,wherever that may be, for has no strength left in him."
5.  "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.
6.  "The stranger," said Telemachus, "shall show me a light; when peopleeat my bread they must earn it, no matter where they come from."

计划指导

1.  "Fall to, stranger," said he, "on a dish of servant's pork. Thefat pigs have to go to the suitors, who eat them up without shame orscruple; but the blessed gods love not such shameful doings, andrespect those who do what is lawful and right. Even the fiercefree-booters who go raiding on other people's land, and Jove givesthem their spoil- even they, when they have filled their ships and gothome again live conscience-stricken, and look fearfully for judgement;but some god seems to have told these people that Ulysses is deadand gone; they will not, therefore, go back to their own homes andmake their offers of marriage in the usual way, but waste his estateby force, without fear or stint. Not a day or night comes out ofheaven, but they sacrifice not one victim nor two only, and theytake the run of his wine, for he was exceedingly rich. No othergreat man either in Ithaca or on the mainland is as rich as he was; hehad as much as twenty men put together. I will tell you what he had.There are twelve herds of cattle upon the mainland, and as many flocksof sheep, there are also twelve droves of pigs, while his own menand hired strangers feed him twelve widely spreading herds of goats.Here in Ithaca he runs even large flocks of goats on the far end ofthe island, and they are in the charge of excellent goatherds. Eachone of these sends the suitors the best goat in the flock every day.As for myself, I am in charge of the pigs that you see here, and Ihave to keep picking out the best I have and sending it to them."
2.  BOOK XIII.
3.  Then, when they had finished their work and the meal was ready, theyate it, and every man had his full share so that all were satisfied.As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, they laid down torest and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
4.  Then Telemachus went out of the court to the place where theAchaeans were meeting in assembly; he had his spear in his hand, andhe was not alone, for his two dogs went with him. But Eurycleacalled the maids and said, "Come, wake up; set about sweeping thecloisters and sprinkling them with water to lay the dust; put thecovers on the seats; wipe down the tables, some of you, with a wetsponge; clean out the mixing-jugs and the cups, and for water from thefountain at once; the suitors will be here directly; they will be hereearly, for it is a feast day."
5.  "My dear, will you be so kind as to show me the house of kingAlcinous? I am an unfortunate foreigner in distress, and do not knowone in your town and country."
6.  "What, my dear, are you talking about?" replied her father, "did younot send him there yourself, because you thought it would help Ulyssesto get home and punish the suitors? Besides, you are perfectly able toprotect Telemachus, and to see him safely home again, while thesuitors have to come hurry-skurrying back without having killed him."

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1.  "The ship ran before a fresh North wind till we had reached thesea that lies between Crete and Libya; there, however, Jove counselledtheir destruction, for as soon as we were well out from Crete andcould see nothing but sea and sky, he raised a black cloud over ourship and the sea grew dark beneath it. Then Jove let fly with histhunderbolts and the ship went round and round and was filled withfire and brimstone as the lightning struck it. The men fell all intothe sea; they were carried about in the water round the ship lookinglike so many sea-gulls, but the god presently deprived them of allchance of getting home again. I was all dismayed; Jove, however,sent the ship's mast within my reach, which saved my life, for I clungto it, and drifted before the fury of the gale. Nine days did Idrift but in the darkness of the tenth night a great wave bore me onto the Thesprotian coast. There Pheidon king of the Thesprotiansentertained me hospitably without charging me anything at all forhis son found me when I was nearly dead with cold and fatigue, whereonhe raised me by the hand, took me to his father's house and gave meclothes to wear.
2.  "Hear me," said he, "aldermen and town councillors of thePhaeacians, that I may speak even as I am minded. This stranger,whoever he may be, has found his way to my house from somewhere orother either East or West. He wants an escort and wishes to have thematter settled. Let us then get one ready for him, as we have done forothers before him; indeed, no one who ever yet came to my house hasbeen able to complain of me for not speeding on his way soon enough.Let us draw a ship into the sea- one that has never yet made a voyage-and man her with two and fifty of our smartest young sailors. Thenwhen you have made fast your oars each by his own seat, leave the shipand come to my house to prepare a feast. I will find you ineverything. I am giving will these instructions to the young men whowill form the crew, for as regards you aldermen and towncouncillors, you will join me in entertaining our guest in thecloisters. I can take no excuses, and we will have Demodocus to singto us; for there is no bard like him whatever he may choose to singabout."
3.  There, then, they left him in very cruel bondage, and having puton their armour they closed the door behind them and went back to taketheir places by the side of Ulysses; whereon the four men stood in thecloister, fierce and full of fury; nevertheless, those who were in thebody of the court were still both brave and many. Then Jove's daughterMinerva came up to them, having assumed the voice and form ofMentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her and said, "Mentor, lend meyour help, and forget not your old comrade, nor the many good turns hehas done you. Besides, you are my age-mate."
4.  "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'
5.   "This hound," answered Eumaeus, "belonged to him who has died in afar country. If he were what he was when Ulysses left for Troy, hewould soon show you what he could do. There was not a wild beast inthe forest that could get away from him when he was once on itstracks. But now he has fallen on evil times, for his master is deadand gone, and the women take no care of him. Servants never do theirwork when their master's hand is no longer over them, for Jove takeshalf the goodness out of a man when he makes a slave of him."
6.  Telemachus and the son of Nestor stayed their horses at the gate,whereon Eteoneus servant to Menelaus came out, and as soon as he sawthem ran hurrying back into the house to tell his Master. He wentclose up to him and said, "Menelaus, there are some strangers comehere, two men, who look like sons of Jove. What are we to do? Shall wetake their horses out, or tell them to find friends elsewhere asthey best can?"

应用

1.  "I was not there," answered Euryclea, "and do not know; I only heardthem groaning while they were being killed. We sat crouching andhuddled up in a corner of the women's room with the doors closed, tillyour son came to fetch me because his father sent him. Then I foundUlysses standing over the corpses that were lying on the ground allround him, one on top of the other. You would have enjoyed it if youcould have seen him standing there all bespattered with blood andfilth, and looking just like a lion. But the corpses are now all piledup in the gatehouse that is in the outer court, and Ulysses has lita great fire to purify the house with sulphur. He has sent me tocall you, so come with me that you may both be happy together afterall; for now at last the desire of your heart has been fulfilled; yourhusband is come home to find both wife and son alive and well, andto take his revenge in his own house on the suitors who behaved sobadly to him."
2.  "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.
3.  "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I took thethree men on whose prowess of all kinds I could most rely, and wentalong by the sea-side, praying heartily to heaven. Meanwhile thegoddess fetched me up four seal skins from the bottom of the sea,all of them just skinned, for she meant playing a trick upon herfather. Then she dug four pits for us to lie in, and sat down towait till we should come up. When we were close to her, she made uslie down in the pits one after the other, and threw a seal skin overeach of us. Our ambuscade would have been intolerable, for thestench of the fishy seals was most distressing- who would go to bedwith a sea monster if he could help it?-but here, too, the goddesshelped us, and thought of something that gave us great relief, for sheput some ambrosia under each man's nostrils, which was so fragrantthat it killed the smell of the seals.
4、  "'You dare-devil,' replied the goddess, you are always wanting tofight somebody or something; you will not let yourself be beateneven by the immortals. For Scylla is not mortal; moreover she issavage, extreme, rude, cruel and invincible. There is no help forit; your best chance will be to get by her as fast as ever you can,for if you dawdle about her rock while you are putting on your armour,she may catch you with a second cast of her six heads, and snap upanother half dozen of your men; so drive your ship past her at fullspeed, and roar out lustily to Crataiis who is Scylla's dam, badluck to her; she will then stop her from making a second raid uponyou.
5、  Telemachus purposely made Ulysses sit in the part of the cloisterthat was paved with stone; he gave him a shabby-looking seat at alittle table to himself, and had his portion of the inward meatsbrought to him, with his wine in a gold cup. "Sit there," said he,"and drink your wine among the great people. I will put a stop tothe gibes and blows of the suitors, for this is no public house, butbelongs to Ulysses, and has passed from him to me. Therefore, suitors,keep your hands and your tongues to yourselves, or there will bemischief."

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  • 刘柳 08-11

      "My dear child," answered Eurynome, "all that you have said is true,go and tell your son about it, but first wash yourself and anoint yourface. Do not go about with your cheeks all covered with tears; it isnot right that you should grieve so incessantly; for Telemachus,whom you always prayed that you might live to see with a beard, isalready grown up."

  • 贺芬 08-11

      Thus did he speak, and his words set them all a weeping. Helen wept,Telemachus wept, and so did Menelaus, nor could Pisistratus keep hiseyes from filling, when he remembered his dear brother Antilochus whomthe son of bright Dawn had killed. Thereon he said to Menelaus,

  • 柯洁 08-11

       "I told my men to draw the ship ashore, and stay where they were,all but the twelve best among them, who were to go along withmyself. I also took a goatskin of sweet black wine which had beengiven me by Maron, Apollo son of Euanthes, who was priest of Apollothe patron god of Ismarus, and lived within the wooded precincts ofthe temple. When we were sacking the city we respected him, and sparedhis life, as also his wife and child; so he made me some presents ofgreat value- seven talents of fine gold, and a bowl of silver, withtwelve jars of sweet wine, unblended, and of the most exquisiteflavour. Not a man nor maid in the house knew about it, but onlyhimself, his wife, and one housekeeper: when he drank it he mixedtwenty parts of water to one of wine, and yet the fragrance from themixing-bowl was so exquisite that it was impossible to refrain fromdrinking. I filled a large skin with this wine, and took a wallet fullof provisions with me, for my mind misgave me that I might have todeal with some savage who would be of great strength, and wouldrespect neither right nor law.

  • 马克·利伯特 08-11

      "I told my men to draw the ship ashore, and stay where they were,all but the twelve best among them, who were to go along withmyself. I also took a goatskin of sweet black wine which had beengiven me by Maron, Apollo son of Euanthes, who was priest of Apollothe patron god of Ismarus, and lived within the wooded precincts ofthe temple. When we were sacking the city we respected him, and sparedhis life, as also his wife and child; so he made me some presents ofgreat value- seven talents of fine gold, and a bowl of silver, withtwelve jars of sweet wine, unblended, and of the most exquisiteflavour. Not a man nor maid in the house knew about it, but onlyhimself, his wife, and one housekeeper: when he drank it he mixedtwenty parts of water to one of wine, and yet the fragrance from themixing-bowl was so exquisite that it was impossible to refrain fromdrinking. I filled a large skin with this wine, and took a wallet fullof provisions with me, for my mind misgave me that I might have todeal with some savage who would be of great strength, and wouldrespect neither right nor law.

  • 娄华 08-10

    {  Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."

  • 马蔚华 08-09

      "Son of Atreus," it said, "we used to say that Jove had loved youbetter from first to last than any other hero, for you were captainover many and brave men, when we were all fighting together beforeTroy; yet the hand of death, which no mortal can escape, was laid uponyou all too early. Better for you had you fallen at Troy in thehey-day of your renown, for the Achaeans would have built a mound overyour ashes, and your son would have been heir to your good name,whereas it has now been your lot to come to a most miserable end."}

  • 祁梦竹 08-09

      "On this the ghost of Teiresias went back to the house of Hades, forhis prophecyings had now been spoken, but I sat still where I wasuntil my mother came up and tasted the blood. Then she knew me at onceand spoke fondly to me, saying, 'My son, how did you come down to thisabode of darkness while you are still alive? It is a hard thing forthe living to see these places, for between us and them there aregreat and terrible waters, and there is Oceanus, which no man cancross on foot, but he must have a good ship to take him. Are you allthis time trying to find your way home from Troy, and have you neveryet got back to Ithaca nor seen your wife in your own house?'

  • 汤味 08-09

      The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."

  • 蒋公馆 08-08

       Ulysses, therefore, went to Parnassus to get the presents fromAutolycus, who with his sons shook hands with him and gave himwelcome. His grandmother Amphithea threw her arms about him, andkissed his head, and both his beautiful eyes, while Autolycusdesired his sons to get dinner ready, and they did as he told them.They brought in a five year old bull, flayed it, made it ready anddivided it into joints; these they then cut carefully up intosmaller pieces and spitted them; they roasted them sufficiently andserved the portions round. Thus through the livelong day to thegoing down of the sun they feasted, and every man had his full shareso that all were satisfied; but when the sun set and it came ondark, they went to bed and enjoyed the boon of sleep.

  • 鲁伊·科斯塔 08-06

    {  "Very well," replied Telemachus, "go home when you have had yourdinner, and in the morning come here with the victims we are tosacrifice for the day. Leave the rest to heaven and me."

  • 杜刚 08-06

      To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Stranger, though a stillpoorer man should come here, it would not be right for me to insulthim, for all strangers and beggars are from Jove. You must take whatyou can get and be thankful, for servants live in fear when theyhave young lords for their masters; and this is my misfortune now, forheaven has hindered the return of him who would have been alwaysgood to me and given me something of my own- a house, a piece of land,a good looking wife, and all else that a liberal master allows aservant who has worked hard for him, and whose labour the gods haveprospered as they have mine in the situation which I hold. If mymaster had grown old here he would have done great things by me, buthe is gone, and I wish that Helen's whole race were utterly destroyed,for she has been the death of many a good man. It was this matter thattook my master to Ilius, the land of noble steeds, to fight theTrojans in the cause of kin Agamemnon."

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